Must Know How To Find The Best Criminal Defense Attorney

Who Needs a Criminal Defense Lawyer?

The point being, hiring a good criminal defense attorney can sometimes prevent charges from being filed. They can sometimes prevent being arrested in front of family and friends.  And they can sometimes prevent additional charges against you.  It is one of those times in your life where there really is not a negative side.  On the positive side, you will have an advocate, a champion, a “defender” that will stand in front of you and protect your constitutional rights.  The government has numerous resources at its disposal to investigate you and charge you.  You need someone on your side to stand up for you and help keep that power in balance.

You need a criminal lawyer if you are being accused, investigated, charged, or arrested for any criminal offense. It is in your best interest to seek the counsel of an experienced and trustworthy attorney immediately.

 

Advantages of Becoming a Criminal Attorney

Whether it’s a financial reward, a noble endeavor, the love of sheer excitement, below are just a few of advantages of becoming a criminal attorney.

A Noble Endeavor

“Every single day of my life I wake up thrilled that I have the honor of being a criminal defense lawyer.” This from attorney Don Murray in “Why Be a Criminal Defense Lawyer.” The job of a criminal defense lawyer is so very important in a civilized society that in the eyes of the founding fathers they recorded it into our very Bill of Rights in the Sixth Amendment – “and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.” Not too shabby.

High Stakes Excitement

Many criminal attorneys love the sheer excitement in a winner-take-all, loser-loses-all situation. Another advantage of becoming a criminal attorney is because the high stakes venture gets the blood rushing. Evidently, one of the advantages of being a criminal lawyer is that it’s much more exciting to talk about a bank robbery than it is to discuss Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code.

A Darn Good Argument

A good argument goes a long way to stimulating a criminal attorney’s mind. Especially when the argument must be well-reasoned, well-researched and well-organized. Most of the action in a lawyer’s work takes place outside of the courtroom and a criminal lawyer’s work is no exception. Where the well-prepared lawyer gets to wind it up and fire that dramatic pitch is in the courtroom, of course. But, it’s also in the office after a magnificent plea deal is agreed upon.

Defending the Constitution

In addition to the Sixth Amendment to the Constitution, the Fourth Amendment assures the world that the United States will brook no unreasonable searches or seizures. Again, it is the duty and honor of criminal attorneys to ensure that proper police work is conducted in the effort to solve crimes and protect the people.

Defending the Person

Many criminal defense attorneys get asked why they make their livings defending criminals and getting them off scot-free. Even with our mighty Constitution and Bill of Rights, all too often assumptions are made that if a person is accused of a crime, they must actually be guilty of that crime. Imagine, if you will, you hear a loud banging on your door at 6:00 a.m. in the morning. It’s the FBI and they have your home surrounded. They burst in through all the doors and start yelling that you are surrounded.

 

Make More Money

Defense attorneys can make quite a bit of money. The Bureau of Labor Statistics found that the median salary for lawyers is nearly $116,000 a year. Those making the highest salaries are those working for private firms and in private practice. The clients who come to you have the money necessary to pay your costs as well as the cost of hiring any experts to work on that case. You can also work for a local agency that provides free or reduced cost legal services for clients who make less money.

Have More Flexibility

During your time in law school, you’ll hear horror stories about what it’s like working in a law firm as a recent graduate. You’ll hear about attorneys working 60 hours or more a week and how new lawyers seldom have time for themselves. One of the reasons to become a defense attorney though is that defense attorneys often have more flexible schedules than other lawyers do. Once you gain more experience, you can decide which cases you want to take on and how you want to divide up the work. You can use associates and others in your practice to prepare for that case without that case taking over your life.

Help Those Who Cannot Help Themselves

One of the top reasons to become a defense attorney is because you’ll have the chance to help others who cannot help themselves. Working in a legal aid office or for a civil rights organization lets you work on cases that involve an individual charged with a crime who does not have the financial means to hire a lawyer. These clients may suffer from mental diseases, have a lack of education or have a history of criminal activities in the past. With your help, they can escape their criminal charges.

 

Criminal Lawyer Skills & Competencies

Criminal lawyers must possess a variety of additional skills to succeed in their jobs, including the following:

  • Writing and speaking skills: Excellent oral and written advocacy skills in order to argue a client’s case before a judge and persuade a jury.
  • Research and investigative skills: Investigative and research skills are also important in building a client’s case and establishing a strong defense.
  • Creative and analytical skills: Strong creative thinking and analytical skills to develop a legal strategy, analyze case law and litigate complex cases.
  • Legal knowledge and experience: In-depth understanding of state, federal and local rules, court procedures, evidentiary laws, and local judges to navigate the criminal justice system efficiently and competently.
  • Interpersonal skills: Excellent interpersonal skills are necessary to build a strong client-attorney relationship. Criminal defendants are a finicky group who sometimes go through many lawyers before settling on one they like. Therefore, the ability to attract and retain clients is essential to a thriving criminal defense practice.

 

THEY’RE ALWAYS WATCHING THE JURY’S BODY LANGUAGE.

Keeping tabs on a jury means being able to assess which direction they’re leaning. Lichtman says body language can tell him a lot. “You can feel how a trial is going,” he says. Jurors who laugh or smile at his jokes are on his side. Jurors turning away from him are not. “You can tell who’s following you. They’re energized by your arguments.”

Evaluating how jurors are reacting allows Lichtman to make real-time adjustments to his arguments. “As I’m questioning a witness or beseeching the jury during a summation, if I see someone turn away from me, I keep that juror in mind and what may have turned him or her off, and try to rectify or address it down the road,” he says. “If I have someone laughing, I know that there’s a juror who may not be acquitting my client but he or she is at least open to it, so I spend a lot of time working on them.”